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Dragon Antique Walking Canes

In both the East and West, dragons are a symbol of power. A wizard who can control a dragon or a warrior who can conquer this great creature will command the power of his world. It is sometimes the evil power, other times a protector’s. Hence it is a really popular theme for men’s canes. With an antique dragon walking cane, you can hold that power in your hand, and it is very suitable as a gentleman’s fashion accessory.

Although many dragon legends are found all over Europe, several of the most famous ones are from the British Isles, and some cane-makers created beautiful cane handles after these dragons. Here are some of the most famous “named” dragons that are currently available as canes:

St. George’s Dragon

One of the most popular dragons is St. George’s. It appears in many art forms, including the walking canes. There are several different versions of St. George’s dragon stories, but the most famous one is of the dragon attacking the city of Selene in Libya. This dragon demanded a child each day for its meal, and one day the king’s daughter was chosen for the sacrifice. Just as the dragon was about to eat her up, a European knight came to rescue her. After a long fierce fight, the knight finally killed the dragon, and freed the city. People were so grateful that they converted to Christianity under St. George.

In the old English legend of St. George, the dragon named Dadianus is an evil sorcerer who can change himself into a serpent. St. George trapped the evil spirit of Dadianus in the walking cane he carries for eternity to commemorate the victory of good over evil.

There are a few different artistic representations of St. George’s dragon, but the dragon wrapping around the cane is most popular.

Lambton Dragon

Another famous dragon in England is Lambton dragon from the legend of the Lambton Worm and Penshaw Hill. It was during the time of the Crusades that John Lambton caught a hideous, black, worm-like creature while fishing. He did not know what to do with it, so he threw it into an ancient well and forgot about it. The years passed, and he was gone on the Crusades for a long time. When he returned home, he found his village devastated by the worm, which had now grown into a monstrous dragon. With the help of a wise woman, he managed to kill the dragon, but his house was cursed and for nine generations no lord of Lambton would die in his bed.

Although a currently available reproduction cane with Lambton dragon looks like an Asian dragon, many older illustrations show that Lambton dragon is more like a sea serpent monster without legs or scales.

Henham Dragon

The Henham dragon was first sighted in 1668 in the British village of Henham, Essex. It was described as being nine feet long with small wings. The eyes were surrounded by strange feathers. Numerous sightings of the dragon were reported over the next year. Some just caught a glimpse of it in the distance, while others said it flew overhead. In 1669, a pamphlet called “The Flying Serpent or Strange News Out of Essex” was published and a copy of the pamphlet still exists at Saffron Walden library. This dragon was actually a hoax known as the “Henham Dragon Hoax of 1668.” Still, it stimulated the imaginations of many artists and craftsmen, who designed some very nice walking canes.

Brinsop Dragon

This dragon lived in a well in Duck’s Pool Meadow in Brinsop. It was killed by a local knight, but some insist that this knight was St. George. Yes, he was a busy guy! Most illustrations found for this dragon show large wings which is typical for modern-day images. The dragon sculpture on the current reproduction cane is actually quite nice looking, although probably hard to carry around.

Asian Dragon

Although they are not British, it is worth mentioning Asian dragons. Unlike in the Western equivalent, in Eastern-world legends dragons are usually in pairs, one good and one evil. If a good dragon wins, the village will prosper. If the evil one wins, the village will perish. They are a sort of symbol of the yin-yang relationship. One of most famous dragon tales from China is of a black and a white dragon. A famous wood carpenter was traveling with his son to a distant city. They passed one side of an ominous lake, with an island in the middle covered by a dark cloud. The son was thirsty and drank water from the lake when, suddenly, a black dragon appeared from the cloud, snatched the son, and disappeared. The father ran to the nearby village for help but no one could do anything. Half-crazed, he started carving a dragon from white wood laying around the side of the lake. He carved and carved without food, without sleep. When he removed the last chip from the dragon’s eye, suddenly the wooden dragon came alive, flew to the black cloud, and started fighting with the black dragon. After many hours of fighting, both dragons disappeared under water, the black cloud cleared from the island, and the carpenter found his son sitting on the island.

The Asian dragons have no wings, but always have four legs, a pair of long whiskers and often a beard. It is quite easy to distinguish one from the European dragons.

Dragon Claws
A dragon-claw cane is a more recent creation from fantasy novels and films. A dragon claw holding a crystal or silver ball is quite popular. According to stories, the hand of a dragon was a talisman for many wizards. The sphere held in the dragon’s claw represents the world, and he who owns this talisman will conquer the world. You can find several reproductions in this category. These canes are very popular among women interested in goth and/or vampire fashion than men and may not be as suitable as a gentleman’s fashion accessory.

Although many original dragon walking canes from the 19th century or earlier were made of wood, bone, and ivory, the currently available dragon canes are usually made of pewter, and often made in Italy. Some no-name cheaper dragon canes are made in China and India. (Don’t discount Indian craftsmanship, however. They make really nice canes at a reasonable price.) None of these canes are for orthopedic use. They are meant only as a gentleman’s fashion accessory, and cheaper ones are for home decorations.

Feng Shui Dragon Information – The Mighty and Mystical

Feng shui dragon symbols, their power and purpose are enchanting and yes, it is real. Some call it a myth. Some call it nothing more than a useless belief. Is it something that is brought upon from Chinese mythology? Or is it something that does have a reality and has been proven to provide worth, value and acceptance. The results have been seen and successful outcomes have been and will be currently utilized through out the world today. It isn’t fake and it isn’t just a dream from some Chinese prophecy.

Feng Shui is NOT about religion, astrology, philosophy or superstition. It is the Study of ENERGY (Quantum Physics), and how that energy “effects” lives, homes, offices and careers.

Will Feng Shui Interfere with my Religious Beliefs?

No. Feng Shui was developed by the Chinese people who happened to be Buddhists, but it is not related to any religion or spiritual belief system — it is an Earth Science. The foundation of Quantum Physics and Relativity.

More than just the Chinese culture believes that this force is real and does exist. The United States, the western world believes in this practice and philosophy and yes are using it because it is real and it does work. It enchants and stirs the imagination. The Dragon is one of the four celestial animal that is an important yet powerful symbol in feng shui. The other three are the Tortoise, the White Tiger and the Red Bird (the Phoenix). The Dragon represents the ultimate Yang symbol, male vitality, bravery and courage. It is magnanimous and full of strength. The Dragon becomes a very powerful and potent symbol when placed facing the East and in the east sector of any house or room, but not the rooms that are listed below. The dragon image can be placed pointing in other directions as well.

In Chinese culture and perhaps even in the Western culture of feng shui, the dragon is the most favorable, sacred and magnificent of all the other celestial creatures and to be treated with great respect. Through generations, the dragon has been the ultimate symbol of luck, fortune, harmony, well-being and honor. In ancient times, Emperors of China regarded themselves as dragons and the symbol of dragon could only be used by them and no one else.

The Dragon’s cosmic breath is believed to have created the chi of the universe. Chi consists of three phases. These are called Sheng (moving upwards or moving forward), Si (dying or waning), and Sha (indicative and harmful energy). Feng Shui is the positive and helpful chi energy in the Sheng category. It is a positive energy and found in places that are uplifting, bright and refreshing. Living in these places are generally happy and peaceful.

The good energy Sheng Chi, brings good fortune and comfort into our homes and workplaces. Making it an all around bringer of good luck. The Dragons are a powerful tool and enhancer of business luck as well. They bring foresight and wisdom to the elderly, honor to the family and they protect the wearer in the coming years.

The Dragon is the fifth sign of the Chinese zodiac and its internal element is earth. The compass direction is about 98 degrees to around 128 degrees. That is why it likes to face to the east using those bearings. Its allies are the Rat and the Monkey and the Rooster has its secret friend. The Dragon is frequently seen in paintings, statues or sculptures holding a ball or a pearl. This symbolizes success and victory in wealth and career achievement.

Here is how you can use the dragon to feng shui your way to a better life.

1. For career luck and those seeking continuous achievement, place a dragon figurine on the table, cabinet or in the East side of your office or study. Your professional luck will look much better.

2. Activate the dragon by placing it in the eastern location of your home or living room. This brings good health and harmony to the residents of the house.

3. Place your dragon image or statue near your aquarium or a water source such as a fountain for good fortune and advancement in your career. It will also work if you are seeking fame and recognition.

4. Dragons made from metal or decorated metal can be used to fend-off evil influences of the troublesome and volatile #5 yellow star and the #2 black star. The black #2 star is also known as the sickness star at it brings illnesses and ailments. The #5 yellow star is the disaster star and it instigates fights, accidents and death. Placing the metallic Dragon in these affected areas will dissolve these energies. A six-rod wind chime made of brass would be a great feng shui cure.

5. Place the dragon in a northern location to enhance your career luck. By placing it in a northern location, it too will help you up the company ladder.

6. If you were born in the year of the dragon, place the dragon on the east side of your work desk or study desk to promote good wealth.

7. By placing the dragon in the northwest area of your home, this will bring mentors, advisors and powerful friends into your life.

Important things to remember:

Try to place the dragon at eye level or lower. This will help to ensure that they are still under our control. Another mistake that many people make is to place nine dragons throughout the house, as it represents number nine. However, this has to be avoided and the maximum number of dragons that should be kept in the house is five.

Try not to place any representation of the dragon inside the bedroom as the dragon is the ultimate yang symbol and it is not meant to be in place where there is a yin energy present. This will produce a competition effect and the dragons power will cease to work.

Do not place your dragon near the toilet or in the bathroom. The bathroom water is used for washing or flushing and symbolizes the unclean water. And refrain from putting it in the garage or a closet. This is because the dragon represents activity and placing it in rooms which are meant for inactivity may not be wise.

Is your Boss a Dragon Lady?

Is your boss a Dragon Lady?

Everyone has had a bad female boss or two in their day.
But have you ever worked for a DRAGON LADY?
What’s a Dragon Lady boss, you ask? Here are a few examples of what a Dragon Lady boss does:

There’s the tale of a boss that did not pay her workers before Christmas vacation and then called a meeting at 9 a.m. on the day after New Year’s. She opened the meeting with a condescending ‘So, did Santa give you everything that you wanted?’ and then she scanned the room and told each of her paycheck-less employees what their New Year’s resolutions should be.

Then there’s the boss that hosts marathon, back-to-back meetings without providing coffee or even a glass of water for the captured.

Who can forgive the boss that demands that you complete a task and then works behind your back to make sure that your task never reaches its completion?
Oh, wait, there’s one more–that boss that works you like a slave for pennies and then constantly tells you that you shouldn’t ask for a raise because ‘we’re in this together.’

Urban legends, right? Nope. These Dragon Ladies do exist, and unfortunately, the aforementioned examples were all the same woman.
She used to be my boss long ago.

My boss is long gone now, but she has had an effect on my life: Because of her, I strive to be a mentor, not a TORMENTOR of the professional women that I work with on a daily basis.

The way I see it, someone must stick up for the nameless, faceless, female worker bees. And the women who have made it must reach back to mentor others. It doesn’t take much to dole out candid advice about how to polish a professional image, and ultimately work their way up the corporate ladder.

And when it comes to Dragon Lady bosses, it’s up to the powers that be to clean house.
After all, if you’re a business owner, Dragon Lady managers are running your young female talent out the front door. If you’re an entrepreneur that conduct business with a Dragon Lady business owner, it’s possible that her overworked, abused team won’t give you their best.

If you want to succeed, you’ve got to send the Dragon Lady packing, Corporate America.
You’ve got to clean house.

Cleaning house, that is, re-grouping and re-evaluating what employers/managers/partnerships, etc., are meeting your expectations, is an uncomfortable but necessary task if you want to keep your business afloat.

Pride, principle and office politics can surely get in the way when it’s time for you to clean house, and believe me, female entrepreneurs may know this better than most. Nevertheless, there are two golden rules to follow when you clean house: 1). Always cultivate the roses; and 2). Always pluck the weeds.

Here are a few tips to help you determine if there are weeds hiding in your rose garden:

How to Spot a Rose
(Employers/vendors/partnerships that you cultivate)

She is competent, and confident instead of controlling. She can assign a task and not feel inclined to follow up or micro-manage.

She is an agile, multi-tasker that responds swiftly to new challenges.

She is a self-starter, a continuous learner, and leader; she may implement a company-training program.

She has new ideas that, when implemented, positively influences the company’s profitability.

She comes to work on time, and will stay longer if needed.

She is respectful and works well with a group of subordinates and alone.

How to Spot a Weed
(Employers/vendors/partnerships that you pluck)

There’s a high turnover rate in her department.

She writes numerous disciplinary memos; she has increased rates of employee absenteeism.

She rarely, if ever, suggests a subordinate for a raise or a promotion.

She is a disruptive whiner that inspires others to be whiny and disruptive. Or, she is an intrusive micro-manager that demands your full attention at all times.

There is evidence of alcohol or substance abuse.

Loyalty and truthfulness are concepts that she knows not; especially when it comes to her subordinates.

In her mind, badgering is essential if an employee is to complete a task.

Dragon Lady managers will drain your business unnecessarily, if you let them.
Consult with your HR director or a trusted employee rights attorney and clean house immediately; attempting to humor a Dragon Lady and/or delay the inevitable is a waste of time and energy.

On the other hand, good managers will produce more return for every employee that they supervise, because they realize it is in their best interest to award and promote subordinates accordingly.

The good manager is usually found among the movers-and-shakers in business, entertainment and politics, and often convenes to connect, network and impart her wisdom.
Sometimes she may seem hard to find, but she’s out there.
And if you’re a female professional, your work life will be fulfilled if your paths should ever meet.
Carpe Diem.