Lessons Learned From A Bearded Dragon Owner

Year of the Dragon – 2012

In Chinese tradition, every year is dedicated to a particular animal. The 12 animals that are a part of this tradition are the Dragon, the Horse, the Monkey, the Rat, the Boar, the Rabbit, the Dog, the Rooster, the Ox, the Tiger, the Snake and the Ram. Each of these animals is believed to bestow its characteristics to individuals who are born in its year.

According to the Chinese astrology 2012 is the Year of the Dragon. And true to the animal’s nature, the Year of the Dragon is expected to be marked with excitement, exhilaration, intensity and unpredictability. The drama and spirit of the dragon is expected to inject vitality, energy and unbridled enthusiasm which could easily lead individuals to throwing caution to the wind. It is especially important to take care this year, and avoid unnecessary risks that could lead to tragedy.

The dragon year is a special year for excellence and Chinese astrology dictates that dragon people are expected to excel during this year. The Year of the Dragon is special in many ways. For one, you will find that the dragon is the only unreal animal featured in the Chinese zodiac year. What’s more, the dragon is revered and has a special place in Chinese astrology. In fact, the dragon is generally of special significance to Chinese people.

History

The Year of the Dragon can trace its origins to over 4,000 years ago. During this time, China was formed by two very large tribes and many smaller tribes. An animal represented each one of these tribes. When the two larger tribes decided to unite, they decided that their emblem would be the dragon as a symbol of power. Today, Han Chinese still call themselves descendants of the dragon.

The Dragon

Because its body comprises of parts from different types of animals including fish, tiger, eagle and snake, the dragon is regarded as a powerful and mighty king in Chinese astrology. Unlike the perception in the west of a threatening evil being, the Chinese dragon is regarded more as a symbol of power, protection, authority and superiority. As a result, in many places in China, you will find numerous sculptures and carvings of dragons.

The Dragon Personality and Dragon People

Chinese astrology deems a dragon person as special. As such, individuals who are born in the Chinese Year of the Dragon typically stand out and enjoy a status befitting a dragon. Such persons are generally regarded as being wise and powerful. They are not shy, but instead command respect and attention with their passion, courage and self-confidence. In short, dragon people have a certain aura about them and seem to enjoy very good fortune.

Dragon people are generally regarded as doers as they are able to achieve power by taking action and getting things done. These individuals at best will have pioneering spirits, but at worst, their foolhardiness will easily get them into trouble. Dragon individuals are smart, enterprising and generally have a wicked sense of humor. If you want to remain updated on the latest trends, consult dragon people as they have a flair for fashion. Just as the fire-breathing dragon, dragon people are generally thought to be hotheads. It is therefore wise to steer clear of them in the event that they get angry!

In contrast however, because dragons have soft underbellies, dragon people are thought to have soft spots as well. As such, you may find a dragon person easily angered, yet capable of great compassion for those who are in need of their help. This contrast is further illustrated by dragon people who can be confronting, but if you touch their soft hearts, they quickly become worthwhile allies. In addition, they are generous – although this is a positive thing, it can easily turn problematic when they become foolhardy with money.

Dragons have long tongues which they often bare and make visible. In turn, dragon people are generally said to have sharp tongues that make them say things that can be very sarcastic and biting to whomever they are directed to.

2012: The Year of the Dragon

The Year of the Dragon 2012 will begin on January 23rd this year, which marks the beginning of 15 days of celebration. January 23rd is actually the Chinese New Year or Lunar New Year which typically occurs in the early months of January or February.

In accordance with the Chinese horoscope 2012 will be ushering in the Water Dragon. The water works in calming the innate fire of the dragon. As such, water dragon people are more open to others opinions and are better able to channel their charisma into leadership qualities. Celebrities born in the Year of the Dragon include Al Pacino, John Lennon, Matt Dillon, Marlene Dietrich and Ringo Starr.

If you were born in a Chinese Year of the Dragon, then according to feng shui 2012 is your year. But what does this mean? Well, first, you should double your efforts in whatever you do – be it your work, studies or any other projects you may be working on. And once you do this, you will find that your natural abilities and talents will easily stand out and enable you to achieve great results. It is also important to watch your temper in 2012 to avoid ruining all your hard work this year.

The Dragon and Love

Because dragons are passionate, they tend to fall in and out of love just as quickly. With their charm and charisma, they are able to easily draw the attention and admiration of individuals of the opposite sex which is what dragon people crave. While they tend to treat love like a game, when they meet the right partner who is strong enough to match their strength, they can settle down.

Wealth in the Year of the Dragon

If you are looking to start a business or begin a new project, the Year of the Dragon is the time to do it. This is because money is more easily accessible for everyone this year – whether you earn, borrow or receive it as a gift. However, avoid unreasonable expenditures as you will have to account for these once the Year of the Dragon comes to an end.

Dragon Slayers

BBC Television in the UK has a surprise hit: Dragons’ Den. In this show, entrepreneurs pitch to a panel of 5 successful business men and women, with the prize being investment by the ‘Dragons’ in the fledgling business.

It’s compelling viewing, partly because of the sheer diversity of inventions and new business ideas on display, but principally because the Dragons are so rude and aggressive with entrepreneurs.

If a Dragon likes a proposition, they will offer a sum of money in exchange for an equity share – sometimes asking for as much as 50% of a business. These people are strong negotiators, in a position of strength, dealing with often inexperienced negotiators who may be in front of a TV camera for the first time.

These negotiations are compelling, and highly revealing. There are many lessons to be learned from observing the ways in which people handle this pressure, but the one I wish to focus on here is the nature of dominance. Time after time, Dragons show a surprising failure to understand the mindset of people who are different to them.

A recent show had an entrepreneur with a truly wonderful product – a seatbelt adjustor to keep children comfortable and safe – which all the Dragons loved. However, one Dragon simply could not understand why this entrepreneur hadn’t succeeded in setting up a distribution deal – he actually accused the man of laziness. I think most people would have looked at this entrepreneur and said to themselves ‘he isn’t really a salesman, he’s an inventor. Respect his skills – don’t expect him to excel in salesmanship’. Yet this Dragon persisted in tearing a strip off the poor man, who responded with calmness and dignity (and yes, he did eventually close his deal).

Why did a successful businessman have so much difficulty understanding that we are not all born salesmen? I believe that this is a kind of ‘mind blindness’, a difficulty which I have observed in many dominant personalities. Natural leaders often have difficulty understanding submissive behaviours. Sometimes they will accuse gentle people of a kind of dishonesty – they simply cannot accept that a person can be unassuming, lacking in ego or have little desire to dominate. Freudians might describe this as a form of ‘projection’ – the dominant individual unconsciously believes that everybody shares his wishes and aspirations, and is sometimes genuinely baffled by the decisions other people make.

It is commonplace to hear natural leaders described as ‘confident’, but I would like to differ. That is a very narrow view of confidence. It is my belief that the truly confident person is able to be modest, unassuming and open to other people, if this is their preference. Expressing your beliefs candidly and calmly, and accepting that others may have different beliefs, is a hallmark of true confidence. Dominance traits may help you to succeed in business, but business is only a small part of the much greater enterprise of life.

And the truly confident people on Dragons’ Den? They are the handful of entrepreneurs who maintain their dignity and calmness in an atmosphere of intimidation and challenge. We all encounter dragons in our daily lives – maybe people who are very senior at work, or perhaps those who appear to have been born to rule. How we deal with dragons says a great deal about us; we know that we are truly adult when we can respond firmly and gently, without resentment, and stand our ground. This is an example of Status Confidence in action – the ability to deal with people appropriately regardless of their status. For further information on this topic, please consult http://www.confidenceclub.net/content/statusconfidence.php