How to Incorporate the Feng Shui Dragon in Your Home Decorating

The Feng Shui dragon is one of the most auspicious of all ancient Chinese symbols. It is not only one of the most powerful of the Feng Shui cures but is the embodiment of yang, the strong masculine energy.

The Feng Shui dragon is best known as the traditional cure for wealth and prosperity. If you consult the Bagua, the Feng Shui energy map, you will learn that the financial area of your home is in the southeast.

According to Chinese astrology, the wealth star changes every year. For 2009, southeast is the luckiest sector, with star 8 as the wealth star. Fire colors are recommended in 2009 to decorate your home office. A golden dragon here is the penultimate prosperity cure. If your southeast area is missing or incomplete, you can use a mirror to balance out the space. Chinese coins can also bring good fortune.

Traditionally dragons were believe to be able to control the climate. Wind, clouds and rain, all beyond our control, were thought to be controlled by dragons. This makes the Feng Shui dragon a powerful symbol for agricultural businesses and those businesses that rely on the weather.

Because the dragon is the embodiment of male energy and success, it makes a great housewarming or business gift for the man in your life. Selecting a dragon with a pearl or crystal in its claw symbolizes power, good fortune and a wealth of opportunities.

To strengthen the love and marriage area of your home, consult your Bagua, then be sure to pair the Dragon with the Phoenix. This pairing is the ultimate symbol for marital bliss.

Dragons also symbolize the number 9, the number of luck and good fortune in Chinese tradition… Having a dragon with the number 9 is a good way to bring good luck to those who possess it. Don’t be tempted to place 9 dragons in your home for extra luck, the maximum number of dragons recommended is five.

The dragon carries a strong energy of activity and creativity, so avoid using in low energy areas like the bathroom or garage. Place the dragon around eye level, and not too much higher, and always treat the dragon with respect. Don’t stick it in a closet! Place him in an open space, facing towards the center of the home, but not against a wall or corner. If there is a pearl or crystal in its claw, never face them towards a door or window.

Placed with honor, the Feng Shui dragon can bring success to many areas of your life, and allow you to harness the power of the dragon!

Feng Shui dragon, and to learn how to incorporate these principles into more balanced home decorating, without spending a fortune, visit: http://www.fengshuilight.com

Into the Dragon’s Den

When anyone comes up with an invention, the next step is to find someone to give them the financial backing that they can’t supply themselves. To do this, they must have a tangible product for the person or company they are approaching to get a proper feel for. The idea needs to be well thought through in its practicality and monetary feasibility. The inventor needs to have done thorough, provable research to show that there is a niche in the market that this particular product would fill, that it would make a profit.

This type of negotiations have gone on since the beginning of time. Now, however, during our times of economical strain, it has become harder to get people with money to back something that may or may not work. That may or may not prove to be profitable. However, it is still possible and the occurrence of the Dragon’s Den TV programme has got many would-be budding inventors at their desks scribbling away with their plans.

The whole Dragon’s Den format comes from Japan, where it is owned by Sony. Celebrities or high profile company owners that are looking for new investment opportunities sit on a panel and have a designated amount of money in mind that they would like to sink into a new venture.

Trawled in front of them are average Joe’s who are allocated a timed slot to pitch their idea to the dragons and convince them that this is the one deal they cannot afford to miss out on. This is not for the faint hearted. The ones with the money in the Dragons Den are confident and adept at business. They know all the right questions to ask and if you’re not on top of your game and knowing it inside out they will eat you for breakfast.

Those who truly believe in their product, who have fully researched their market, who know their target customers and have the confidence to put this across simply whilst still giving the dragons something they can see or feel, will give them a much better prospect of gaining the backing that they require.

For those that enter the Dragon’s Den trembling with fear, stuttering with nerves and unsure of themselves will come across as unsure of their product. They will be chewed up and spat out in no time by the dragons themselves.

Contestants that have managed to secure finances from the Dragons Den are those that know their product well but do not appear too pushy or cocky. They pitch their idea and hopefully the product will sell itself. Once they have satisfied any doubts the dragons may have and fully sold their product to the best of their ability, then the dragons need to decide whether they want to invest or not.

Negotiations take place. If a dragon would like to invest but is unsure of the products feasibility, they can offer a reduced amount to what the contestant is asking for. While this may be difficult for the person that needs the money, reputation goes a long way and that is what the dragons bring with them, reputation and influence that might just make them successful in their venture.

So what does the dragon get from all this? Well, during negotiations, they can also bargain. The inventor will suggest a reward, usually a stake in the business venture or a cut of the profits, depending on the amount invested. The dragon will then attempt to bring this nearer what he sees as a good deal and eventually an agreement will be reached. One happy inventor, one happy dragon.

Dragon Antique Walking Canes

In both the East and West, dragons are a symbol of power. A wizard who can control a dragon or a warrior who can conquer this great creature will command the power of his world. It is sometimes the evil power, other times a protector’s. Hence it is a really popular theme for men’s canes. With an antique dragon walking cane, you can hold that power in your hand, and it is very suitable as a gentleman’s fashion accessory.

Although many dragon legends are found all over Europe, several of the most famous ones are from the British Isles, and some cane-makers created beautiful cane handles after these dragons. Here are some of the most famous “named” dragons that are currently available as canes:

St. George’s Dragon

One of the most popular dragons is St. George’s. It appears in many art forms, including the walking canes. There are several different versions of St. George’s dragon stories, but the most famous one is of the dragon attacking the city of Selene in Libya. This dragon demanded a child each day for its meal, and one day the king’s daughter was chosen for the sacrifice. Just as the dragon was about to eat her up, a European knight came to rescue her. After a long fierce fight, the knight finally killed the dragon, and freed the city. People were so grateful that they converted to Christianity under St. George.

In the old English legend of St. George, the dragon named Dadianus is an evil sorcerer who can change himself into a serpent. St. George trapped the evil spirit of Dadianus in the walking cane he carries for eternity to commemorate the victory of good over evil.

There are a few different artistic representations of St. George’s dragon, but the dragon wrapping around the cane is most popular.

Lambton Dragon

Another famous dragon in England is Lambton dragon from the legend of the Lambton Worm and Penshaw Hill. It was during the time of the Crusades that John Lambton caught a hideous, black, worm-like creature while fishing. He did not know what to do with it, so he threw it into an ancient well and forgot about it. The years passed, and he was gone on the Crusades for a long time. When he returned home, he found his village devastated by the worm, which had now grown into a monstrous dragon. With the help of a wise woman, he managed to kill the dragon, but his house was cursed and for nine generations no lord of Lambton would die in his bed.

Although a currently available reproduction cane with Lambton dragon looks like an Asian dragon, many older illustrations show that Lambton dragon is more like a sea serpent monster without legs or scales.

Henham Dragon

The Henham dragon was first sighted in 1668 in the British village of Henham, Essex. It was described as being nine feet long with small wings. The eyes were surrounded by strange feathers. Numerous sightings of the dragon were reported over the next year. Some just caught a glimpse of it in the distance, while others said it flew overhead. In 1669, a pamphlet called “The Flying Serpent or Strange News Out of Essex” was published and a copy of the pamphlet still exists at Saffron Walden library. This dragon was actually a hoax known as the “Henham Dragon Hoax of 1668.” Still, it stimulated the imaginations of many artists and craftsmen, who designed some very nice walking canes.

Brinsop Dragon

This dragon lived in a well in Duck’s Pool Meadow in Brinsop. It was killed by a local knight, but some insist that this knight was St. George. Yes, he was a busy guy! Most illustrations found for this dragon show large wings which is typical for modern-day images. The dragon sculpture on the current reproduction cane is actually quite nice looking, although probably hard to carry around.

Asian Dragon

Although they are not British, it is worth mentioning Asian dragons. Unlike in the Western equivalent, in Eastern-world legends dragons are usually in pairs, one good and one evil. If a good dragon wins, the village will prosper. If the evil one wins, the village will perish. They are a sort of symbol of the yin-yang relationship. One of most famous dragon tales from China is of a black and a white dragon. A famous wood carpenter was traveling with his son to a distant city. They passed one side of an ominous lake, with an island in the middle covered by a dark cloud. The son was thirsty and drank water from the lake when, suddenly, a black dragon appeared from the cloud, snatched the son, and disappeared. The father ran to the nearby village for help but no one could do anything. Half-crazed, he started carving a dragon from white wood laying around the side of the lake. He carved and carved without food, without sleep. When he removed the last chip from the dragon’s eye, suddenly the wooden dragon came alive, flew to the black cloud, and started fighting with the black dragon. After many hours of fighting, both dragons disappeared under water, the black cloud cleared from the island, and the carpenter found his son sitting on the island.

The Asian dragons have no wings, but always have four legs, a pair of long whiskers and often a beard. It is quite easy to distinguish one from the European dragons.

Dragon Claws
A dragon-claw cane is a more recent creation from fantasy novels and films. A dragon claw holding a crystal or silver ball is quite popular. According to stories, the hand of a dragon was a talisman for many wizards. The sphere held in the dragon’s claw represents the world, and he who owns this talisman will conquer the world. You can find several reproductions in this category. These canes are very popular among women interested in goth and/or vampire fashion than men and may not be as suitable as a gentleman’s fashion accessory.

Although many original dragon walking canes from the 19th century or earlier were made of wood, bone, and ivory, the currently available dragon canes are usually made of pewter, and often made in Italy. Some no-name cheaper dragon canes are made in China and India. (Don’t discount Indian craftsmanship, however. They make really nice canes at a reasonable price.) None of these canes are for orthopedic use. They are meant only as a gentleman’s fashion accessory, and cheaper ones are for home decorations.